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Can you detect the prey this mountain lion has in its mouth? The scene was caught on a trail digicam in Terrell County, Texas.

A wildlife mystery requirements fixing in southern Texas and specialists wouldn’t thoughts your to enable — if you can abdomen the information.

It includes a December path digicam photo that caught a big mountain lion dragging another animal in its mouth.

Apparently, not even wildlife specialists can establish the unlucky prey, which is a little bit disconcerting.

“Can you recognize this prey animal taken in Terrell County? P.S. We’re guessing, way too,” officers with the Trans-Pecos Wildlife District posted Jan. 14 on Facebook. Terrell County is about 400 miles southwest of Fort Value.

“Lions are opportunistic, preying on a vast vary of animals. Function performed by Borderlands Study Institute identified at the very least 14 species of prey in the diet program of west Texas Mountain Lions.”

The path digital camera bought a clear watch of both of those animals, but the prey’s head is trapped in between the lion’s jaws, creating a company identification very hard. What you can convey to: It is 4-legged, fury and nearly as tall as the mountain lion, when measured from rump to head.

Guesses on Fb have included, a bobcat, piglet, raccoon and grey fox.

A few individuals suggested it may possibly be somebody’s beloved pet or cat, although lots of concluded it appears to be way too huge to be a domestic cat.

“One on my position ate cats, puppies, chickens, guineas, cattle, sheep and horses,” one particular female wrote on Fb. “Killed my neighbors puppies, a person each individual few of times. Goats, miniature horses. My donkeys ended up afraid of it. I knew when it was there. They would be up at the home fence braying.”

Mountain lions — also identified as cougars, panthers, or pumas — “have the capacity to acquire prey up to 5 occasions their excess weight,” the Borderlands Analysis Institute reviews. Males can weigh far more than 230 lbs, and “they can leap 30 feet,” Texas Indigenous Cats claims.

The Borderlands Investigate Institute, based mostly at Sul Ross State College in Alpine, says it is making use of GPS collar data to uncover mountain lion “kill sites” in south Texas, so it can figure out what they are taking in.

Facts collected so significantly have exposed their prey include things like deer, elk, feral hogs and coyotes, the institute states. They’re also major on scavenging animals they uncover dead, officers claimed.

Associated stories from Raleigh Information & Observer

Mark Cost has been a reporter for The Charlotte Observer considering the fact that 1991, covering beats such as educational institutions, criminal offense, immigration, LGBTQ challenges, homelessness and nonprofits. He graduated from the University of Memphis with majors in journalism and art record, and a slight in geology.